Eyes of Lenses // Edition #6

EOL Title Card Righto. So things happened in the first week back. Well, not exactly - but at least it was something interesting to note. As Gillies seems to say each and every week:

[See this as an opportunity] to experiment [because you don't get that much time to, once you're in the industry]

However, I just see this as the Gillies saying, that in near future, we won't have that much time left to experiment in our Cinematography class - so learn quick it seems. Nevertheless, let's delve right into my notes.


Light Meters

Ah. Now that I remember - this week's classes were right up my alley, considering the fact that I'm supposedly doing a presentation on Lux, which seems to be the metric unit of Illuminance (whilst Gillies' preferred measurement unit of Foot Candles says it's imperical (English), and Illuminace itself.

It's becoming late and I'm feeling rather lazy. Thank goodness my notes don't reflect that same idea.

Preface:
“Exposing the Face” —> Bowes-Onions on a car, taking a photo - with the background completely whited-out. Depending on the FOV, one would either expose for the face of a subject (CU, MCU), or would expose for other background elements that help to drive details of environment/setting. 

Light Metering:
The purpose of light metering includes, but is not limited to:
- Lighting continuity (ie. pick-ups)
- Tool for re-creating lighting FX
- Tool on-set for helping to provide correct exposure of the subject.
- Recording ambient light details at a location (Location Scouting)
- Establishing Lighting Ratios.

TWO TYPES OF LIGHT METERING:
Reflective (Leave Dome off):
Taking the reading near the camera which will account for the final total of light that will hit the camera’s sensor. 

Middle-grey theory (8% reflectiveness??) -_-
Spot Meters.

Incidental (Leave Dome on):
Taking the reading at the subject.
[only use the luma disk to read lighting intensity of lights directly]

After doing some tests on the Monday, I feel relatively comfortable on using Light Meters and over-exposing by a third. It seems to do the job well, better than Auto Iris - which should burn in hell.

I'll post the video, that was made on Tuesday, up next week. But for now, two treats for those that read this blog. Firstly, we have an advertisment for Tyler Baikie.

Tyler Baikie: Experienced Videographer

gained inspiration and made a video promoting my friend's services.

Posted by Corey Fuimaono on Saturday, 25 April 2015

Then we have the team intro for "Warrior Wabbits" (still awaiting illustration from Kayla Davidson - but other than that, picture is pretty much on the lockdown)

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